I’ve been in the profession of pharmacy for over half my lifetime. I’ve seen the ins and outs of what happens in independent, hospital, nursing home and chain pharmacies. There are many problems that have plagued pharmacists over the years that have made it difficult at times to practice real, patient oriented pharmacy.  Unfortunately patient care sometimes takes a backseat to all the headaches and stress involved in the prescription filling process.

For most pharmacists the profession has evolved to a hectic paced, overworked environment. Many are filling hundreds of prescriptions each day, dealing with difficult insurance issues and coordinating the prescription filling process understaffed and over-pressured. There are almost always issues and disputes between the overworked support staff. And then there are the interactions with cantankerous customers or the nurse ‘know it all’ that really makes a pharmacist’s day.

All of this can lead to a pharmacy professional that is run ragged by the shear volume of the workload. We often have ‘management’ that thinks they know a better way to fill prescriptions more efficiently to give us time to counsel with our patients. We even have customers that want to weigh in on how to fill prescriptions better. After all, we’re just putting pills in a little bottle that came out of a bigger bottle, right? Oh, and don’t you dare put the blue pills in Mrs. Smith’s bottle that should contain pink pills. We’re still expected to be exacting and perfect in all we do. No wonder so many pharmacists are bald or balding due to the natural phenomenon of pulling one’s hair out.

But even with all this going on, your pharmacist should still be able to satisfy your need for personal pharmacy services. If not, you may need to consider finding a new pharmacist.

Here are three valid reasons why you should consider firing your pharmacist:

1.  Your questions don’t get answered properly. 

Yes the pharmacist is always busy, but they’re still obligated to answer your questions. We’re not talking about questions like “what aisle are the toothpicks on” or “do you know when you will be getting more toothbrushes in stock”. In most states pharmacists are obligated to answer your questions when you pick up a prescription. If your questions can’t be answered at that time, your pharmacist should schedule a time to sit down with you uninterrupted. If you can’t get the answers you need you should fire your pharmacist.

2.  You can’t get a prescription filled in a reasonable amount of time.   

Here again, pharmacies are usually a busy place. But that’s no excuse for a pharmacist to tell you to come back tomorrow for your antibiotic. I’ve witnessed pharmacists telling a mom or dad with a sick child the prescription will be ready in 3 hours… or even longer. A 24 hour pharmacy recently told a young mother with a prescription from the E.R. to come back after 3 a.m. There were no other patrons in the pharmacy when she arrived 4 hours before that. What’s he doing? Taking a 4 hour break or something? Prescription refills are a different story but if you can’t get your new prescription in a reasonable length of time you should fire your pharmacist.

3.  Your pharmacist ignores you or fails to recognize you as a patient. 

There may be more than one pharmacist at a pharmacy location. And every one of them will know by sight some of the customers at that store. We don’t always recognize all of the good customers, but we all seem to know who the bad customers are.  It’s easy to remember Jane Doe because she is the one who never remembers to call in her refill for birth control pills. We all remember John White who repeatedly complains that we shorted him on his Vicodin. But it’s difficult to remember those ‘regulars’ who rarely complain or make a scene.  Regardless, it is unacceptable for a pharmacist to ignore or fail to recognize a customer, good or bad. If you don’t get greeted in a cordial and respectable manner you should fire your pharmacist.

The bottom line: 

If you are still unsatisfied with the service you receive and your pharmacist is as generic as most of the pills on his shelves or breathes negativity with every other word you should find a new pharmacist. One who is willing to go out of his way to ensure you understand your medications. One who will see to it the staff can take care of customers in a reasonable amount of time. And one who will recognize you with a smile on his/her face even though they don’t remember your name.  They’re out there and ready to assist you in transferring your prescriptions to their pharmacy with a promise and commitment to provide the service you deserve.