MORS and SMORS — more than a sweet treat

I’m going out on a limb here and betting many of you have not heard of MORS and SMORS. For your information, they may be one of the best solutions around to improve medication adherence, compliance and patient safety.

Medication Organizer Reminder Systems MORS and Secure Medication Organizer Reminder Systems SMORS are a group of products designed to organize patient medications and provide audible and/or visual alerts to remind patients to take their medication on time, every time.

My interest in MORS and SMORS, (which always reminds me of a good time around a campfire), began nearly three years agosmores 3 when I first started researching medication adherence and compliance.

Although the causes and proposed solutions to the medication adherence/compliance problem vary widely and are often debated, it seems one thing can be agreed upon by all… it is a very costly healthcare problem in the U.S. today. The cost of non-adherence was estimated to be $290 billion annually by the New England Healthcare Institute NEHI in 2009. It’s now estimated by some to be in the neighborhood of $330 billion or more annually.

When you add in the additional costs of adverse drug reactions, medication misuse, lack of control of diseases like hypertension, diabetes, etc., additional physician, hospital and emergency department visits, this figure approaches nearly a half trillion dollars annually.  And this does not even take into consideration the loss of life from inappropriate medication use estimated to be over 125,000 deaths annually.

MORS and SMORS can help patients improve their medication compliance which in turn will improve control of their particular disease and reduce healthcare costs in the long run.

Opening doors for pharmacists —

I recently presented information on April 17th, 2013, to the Oregon Board of Pharmacy on the topic of medication adherence and compliance, the costs associated with the problem and the patient safety issues that arise when patients don’t take medications as prescribed. Pharmacists need to understand and utilize the available technology, including MORS and SMORS, to improve patient outcomes and help reduce healthcare costs.

But at this time the Oregon BOP does not allow pharmacists to dispense, fill or set up medications for use in medication organizer reminder systems. Pharmacy rules for medication labeling and packaging currently prevent pharmacists from doing so as they are not compliant with Board rules and guidelines. Several other states, including neighboring Washington State, have moved forward and adopted rules to allow pharmacists to utilize this technology to improve patient care and safety.

The Board responded favorably to my request by proposing additions to the customized patient medication packaging rule (Oregon 855-041-1140) to provide a waiver for approved medication organizer reminders systems not meeting regular labeling and packaging guidelines. After the recent rulemaking hearing, the Board will now move forward and vote on the new rule and, hopefully, implement this change in Oregon pharmacy law at their August 2013 meeting.

Patient safety is the issue —

The proposed rule change is based on improving patient safety as well as improving medication adherence. Allowing pharmacists to be involved with filling or dispensing medications for use in medication organizer reminder systems will have a positive impact on medication adherence, compliance and medication safety. Do you see the opportunity for pharmacists here?

The real solution —

The impact of the proposed rule changes are not based solely on the use of medication organizer reminder systems. The real solution to the adherence dilemma is getting pharmacists involved with their patients.

A recent report published by the National Community Pharmacy Association NCPA identified what I believe to be the biggest factor for combating the medication adherence problem:

  • The biggest predictor of medication adherence was patients’ personal connection (or lack thereof) with a pharmacist or pharmacy staff. Patients of independent community pharmacies reported the highest level of personal connection (89 percent agreeing that pharmacist or staff “knows you pretty well”), followed by large chains (67 percent) and mail order (36 percent).

“This predicting factor was followed in order of importance by: affordability of medications; continuity in health care usage; how important patients feel it is to take their medication as prescribed; how well informed they feel about their health; and medication side effects.”

Enter here… The Door is OPEN —

The door is now open for pharmacists to seize this opportunity to get involved with medication organizer reminder systems and assist their patients who may be struggling with medication adherence problems.

It’s the perfect addition to patient counseling or medication therapy management MTM to improve patient medication compliance and patient safety.

If your state Board of Pharmacy rules need to be changed for you to get involved, you need to BE THE CHANGE. Address the topic with your state Board and urge them to move the profession of pharmacy forward.

Feel free to contact me for assistance and advice on how to move forward with this in your state.

I was immediately intrigued when I read @PhilBaumann ‘s thought provoking post titled ‘140 Health Care Uses for Twitter‘.

Twitter evolution via @mashable
(nursing caps added)

I’ve observed many of the 140 uses Phil mentions over the last couple of years while following and tweeting on Twitter.  But some of the ideas he came up with were totally new to me, if not ‘off the wall’ in some respects. Phil comments: “there’s potency in the ability to burst out 140 characters, including a shortened URL”… and he’s right!
Twitter is potent medicine!
He also cautioned about several additional issues health care tweeters face including patient privacy, legal and HIPAA concerns.

But if we focus on what Phil suggests, to “be imaginative, determined and innovative” in our approach to using Twitter (and other social media) as a powerful adjunct ‘healthcare tool’, we’ll find even more possibilities and ways to improve patient lives.

As a pharmacist the gears in my head started turning right away after reading #29 – Prescription management, including pharmacy refill reminders.  I thought I would expand on a few uses for Twitter that pharmacists might employ in their practice in the future.

Phil already mentioned the first one on my list, #29a prescription refill reminders. I would add #29b “your prescription is ready” reminders and #29c “we’re waiting for your doctor to authorize a refill” reminders. There may be others that fall into similar, logistical type categories as these.

Here’s a few more I thought of that expand on and utilize the pharmacists professional expertise:

#29d:  Patient Medication Education-

This is an area any pharmacist on Twitter can leverage, after all, pharmacists are medication experts.  Most of my tweets on any given day will have some component of patient education, although some more than others. One patient education plan could be to target specific disease states or patient populations to help them understand their disease and how to manage it properly. Another plan could be to educate patients on drugs and drug interactions as well.

#29e:  Medication compliance and adherence-

Lack of adherence to prescription medication therapy cost the U.S. $317.4 billion in 2011 and we can expect that figure to continue to rise until we find solutions to the problems surrounding the issues of compliance. Pharmacists who find a way to improve medication reminder programs for their patients will not only save healthcare dollars but improve patient lives. Twitter and/or texting could be leveraged to improve patient compliance.

#29f:  Medication safety and drug interaction alerts and reminders- 

Twitter could be utilized by pharmacists to notify patients of medication safety issues and potential drug/drug or food/drug interactions that could be problematic. There are over 2 million cases of adverse drug interactions annually in the U.S. resulting in over 100,000 deaths. The cost of these adverse drug interactions is also in the billions. It’s even more difficult to measure the cost of human suffering and loss of life.

#29g:  Alerting patients about special pharmacy programs- 

Many pharmacies offer special clinical outreach programs and screenings including blood pressure checks, blood glucose screening, bone density testing and immunizations. These could be promoted via Twitter and other social media sites. Twitter could be used as a patient reporting tool for tracking health data.

#29h:  Drug recall notifications- 

Pharmacists and pharmacy technicians are often involved in drug product recalls, both prescription and over-the-counter medications. It’s important to pass this information on to patients and consumers alike.

#29i:  Pharmacist to Pharmacist interaction-

One of the greatest benefits I’ve discovered (and it took me awhile) on Twitter is the ability of pharmacists to connect with other pharmacists. Of course, many pharmacists on Twitter have ‘secret identities’ making it difficult to connect on a professional level, most of them hiding their identities because they use Twitter to vent or as a release from their daily tasks in the pharmacy. You know who you are! Over the past several years I’ve connected with a number of great Twitter pharmacists on a professional level and I look forward to meeting more of you ‘lurking’ out there.

#29j:  Twitter as an professional educational tool- 

Another benefit I’ve found on Twitter is the magnitude to which a pharmacist (or other medical professional) can learn. Professional education, much of it on par with any accredited continuing education or medical education programs can be found if you look in the right places.

#29k:  Building professional credibility- 

Using Twitter (and other social media) can do one of two things for pharmacists and healthcare professionals:  You can use it to build your credibility and establish yourself as an expert in your field OR you can use it to cripple your identity as a professional. Tweet responsibly.  Enough said.

#29l:  Using Twitter to build patient relationships- 

Probably one of the most important ways pharmacists (and other health care professionals) can utilize Twitter is in building relationships with patients and keeping those lines of communication always open. If you’re using social media properly it will have of some component or level of social interaction. And if you can interact with patients and let them get comfortable with who you are they’ll begin to respond by showing trust and confiding in you.

I’m sure if we put on our thinking caps and throw caution to the wind a bit, we could think of more ideas for pharmacists and other medical providers to improve health care by leveraging social media. More important is the charge to be a leader in utilizing this technology to improve health care and not lag behind other professions.

What do you think?

“The pharmacist of tomorrow is going to be unrecognizable to most of us. He might not be a vending machine, but he’s not going to be that quiet old white-haired guy up behind the counter, either.”  —  Jim Ammen as quoted on QuoteSea.

W.C. Fields in The Pharmacist, 1933

The profession of pharmacy is rapidly changing in the 21st century. Gone are the days past when there was a pharmacy on nearly every corner in town and the Rexall brand was known in every household. Independent druggists were first line caregivers in the community, often prescribing medications for illness and ailments when patients could not see a physician. Community pharmacists were seen as a pillar of society… independent, highly visible in the community and usually considered well off financially.

Hospital pharmacies, on the other hand, were usually found in the basement, with an existence almost unknown to physicians, nurses and patients alike. The hospital pharmacy existed, in the mind of many people, solely to perform the dispensing and delivery of prescription medications as ordered by the physician. And likewise, the hospital pharmacist often had an image to match. Their salaries even lagged behind those pharmacists in a community setting until fairly recently. But hospital pharmacist stepped up to the challenge.

Times are a changin’…

Hospital pharmacists began performing many clinical functions supporting the delivery of care in addition to the delivery of drugs. An increasing level in the sophistication and number of pharmaceuticals required an increasing level of knowledge and sophistication on the part of pharmacists as well. While the community pharmacist was still counting by fives and ‘lickin and stickin’ labels, hospital pharmacists were taking on greater roles in drug delivery and patient centric clinical functions. Adding to that the increasing numbers of chemotherapeutic agents, radiopharmaceuticals, biopharmaceuticals, nuclear pharmacy and technological advances in drug delivery have made hospital pharmacy a specialty at the very least.

We now see community pharmacists suffering from numerous attacks on their livelihood. Increasing numbers of third party payers, decreasing margins and higher stress and demand in the prescription filling process have fueled the frustration of many pharmacists:

“The word out in the pharmacy community is that the small pharmacist was sold down the river by the drug companies and the PBMs (pharmacy benefit managers)” — Doug Larson

“I’ve been a pharmacist for 40 years now, and Monday morning I didn’t want to come to work because I knew what would await me. Basically, we’ve got a travesty on our hands” — Charles Pace

“It’s every independent pharmacist’s worst nightmare. There isn’t one component that’s working. It’s so extensive that it’s hard to imagine it’s going to get fixed — Todd Brown   (all quoted from QuoteSea/pharmacists)

These and many other unrepeatable quotes and comments are being heard daily from pharmacists who are overworked and under appreciated, being pushed along towards burnout and increasingly locked into the ‘golden handcuffs’ of the chain pharmacy bullies of the industry. Is it any wonder community pharmacists are complaining?

“I’ve tried to maintain an uneasy balance between your friendly unassuming neighborhood pharmacist and Anthony Perkins in ‘Psycho‘ – Roger Bart, (check the date) September 29, 1962!!

Anthony Perkins as 'Norman Bates' - 'Psycho' 1960

Many of the remaining independents are on the verge of financial ruin. Those who work in chain drugstore settings are frustrated, confused and tired of the ongoing abuse they receive. It’s amazing that we don’t have more pharmacists going postal or psycho as a result of the stressful conditions they work in.”

What will it take to bring about the necessary change in the profession? Payment for cognitive services or medication therapy management services is a step in the right direction. Recognition as healthcare providers by healthcare, governmental and third party payers would also help change this environment. But what will be the driving force to secure the future of community pharmacy?

You Are!

We, who want to be the pharmacists of tomorrow, are going to have to step up and take the lead toward securing the profession. We can’t count on professional associations and lobbyists to do it for us. Many of our professional associations are being managed by non-pharmacists (and we complain about non-pharmacists in corporate managerial positions). New pharmacists coming into the ranks must be prepared to recognize the opportunities that exist. And like the rest of us, they also need to stand up for what is morally right for the profession. We all need to take a lead on providing care that is patient oriented and always look out for the patient’s interests, even when it might be contrary to the ‘business as usual’ profit driven policies of corporate pharmacy. Doing so will win their confidence and secure their advocacy for the services you provide them. If your patients are being served appropriately and their needs taken care of you can be sure their voice of support will be heard.

Step up and do the ‘next right thing’ when it comes to taking care of your patients. Look forward to and expect the changes to take place, but only after you have done your part. Our future will be what we make it to be. Each of you in the profession of pharmacy has an obligation to stand for what you believe. After all, if you don’t, who will?

I’ve been in the profession of pharmacy for over half my lifetime. I’ve seen the ins and outs of what happens in independent, hospital, nursing home and chain pharmacies. There are many problems that have plagued pharmacists over the years that have made it difficult at times to practice real, patient oriented pharmacy.  Unfortunately patient care sometimes takes a backseat to all the headaches and stress involved in the prescription filling process.

For most pharmacists the profession has evolved to a hectic paced, overworked environment. Many are filling hundreds of prescriptions each day, dealing with difficult insurance issues and coordinating the prescription filling process understaffed and over-pressured. There are almost always issues and disputes between the overworked support staff. And then there are the interactions with cantankerous customers or the nurse ‘know it all’ that really makes a pharmacist’s day.

All of this can lead to a pharmacy professional that is run ragged by the shear volume of the workload. We often have ‘management’ that thinks they know a better way to fill prescriptions more efficiently to give us time to counsel with our patients. We even have customers that want to weigh in on how to fill prescriptions better. After all, we’re just putting pills in a little bottle that came out of a bigger bottle, right? Oh, and don’t you dare put the blue pills in Mrs. Smith’s bottle that should contain pink pills. We’re still expected to be exacting and perfect in all we do. No wonder so many pharmacists are bald or balding due to the natural phenomenon of pulling one’s hair out.

But even with all this going on, your pharmacist should still be able to satisfy your need for personal pharmacy services. If not, you may need to consider finding a new pharmacist.

Here are three valid reasons why you should consider firing your pharmacist:

1.  Your questions don’t get answered properly. 

Yes the pharmacist is always busy, but they’re still obligated to answer your questions. We’re not talking about questions like “what aisle are the toothpicks on” or “do you know when you will be getting more toothbrushes in stock”. In most states pharmacists are obligated to answer your questions when you pick up a prescription. If your questions can’t be answered at that time, your pharmacist should schedule a time to sit down with you uninterrupted. If you can’t get the answers you need you should fire your pharmacist.

2.  You can’t get a prescription filled in a reasonable amount of time.   

Here again, pharmacies are usually a busy place. But that’s no excuse for a pharmacist to tell you to come back tomorrow for your antibiotic. I’ve witnessed pharmacists telling a mom or dad with a sick child the prescription will be ready in 3 hours… or even longer. A 24 hour pharmacy recently told a young mother with a prescription from the E.R. to come back after 3 a.m. There were no other patrons in the pharmacy when she arrived 4 hours before that. What’s he doing? Taking a 4 hour break or something? Prescription refills are a different story but if you can’t get your new prescription in a reasonable length of time you should fire your pharmacist.

3.  Your pharmacist ignores you or fails to recognize you as a patient. 

There may be more than one pharmacist at a pharmacy location. And every one of them will know by sight some of the customers at that store. We don’t always recognize all of the good customers, but we all seem to know who the bad customers are.  It’s easy to remember Jane Doe because she is the one who never remembers to call in her refill for birth control pills. We all remember John White who repeatedly complains that we shorted him on his Vicodin. But it’s difficult to remember those ‘regulars’ who rarely complain or make a scene.  Regardless, it is unacceptable for a pharmacist to ignore or fail to recognize a customer, good or bad. If you don’t get greeted in a cordial and respectable manner you should fire your pharmacist.

The bottom line: 

If you are still unsatisfied with the service you receive and your pharmacist is as generic as most of the pills on his shelves or breathes negativity with every other word you should find a new pharmacist. One who is willing to go out of his way to ensure you understand your medications. One who will see to it the staff can take care of customers in a reasonable amount of time. And one who will recognize you with a smile on his/her face even though they don’t remember your name.  They’re out there and ready to assist you in transferring your prescriptions to their pharmacy with a promise and commitment to provide the service you deserve.

Twitter’s @ThePharmerGuy recently posted on his blog ‘Another Day Behind the Pharmacy Counter…’ asking the question:  Why Can’t Pharmacists Prescribe?  He details a very good argument as to why pharmacists should have prescription authority.   My thoughts on this topic follow below:

I totally agree it’s past time for pharmacists to be given prescribing authority, at least on a limited basis. There are so many instances where a pharmacist could make the decision to appropriately select and prescribe from a limited formulary of medications for a number of common disease states.

Pharmacists receive more intensive training and are more qualified to make decisions regarding appropriate medication therapy than most nurse practitioners or physicians assistants I know, and probably more qualified than many MDs as well.

Prescribing authority is given to MDs, NPs and PAs, in my opinion, after receiving basic training algorithms to assist them in making prescribing decisions based on their diagnosis. They don’t receive near the training or knowledge base in pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, adverse drug reactions and drug interactions that should be used in the drug prescribing process. They are also somewhat dependent on and easily swayed by the influence of pharmaceutical sales and marketing efforts, something which pharmacists are able to sort through by throwing out the hype and making better clinical decisions based on rational therapeutic approaches.

And, from what I have seen, most prescribers are easily swayed by their patients as well. All of the direct to consumer pharma advertising has created a patient population who go the the doctor with their expectations of what should be prescribed… and sometimes get upset when they don’t get what they want!

Pharmacist prescribing would expedite patient care and lower the cost of care by facilitating or streamlining the process of finding the correct medication and dose to reach and maintain therapeutic goals. This would tie in very well with a medication therapy management type of pharmacy practice that monitors new medications and makes changes or adjustments quickly and efficiently based on patient response to therapy.

All this would help to reduce costs associated with patient medication therapy,improve and streamline the process of reaching therapeutic goals, aid in assisting, educating and counseling patients to ensure compliance and adherence to drug therapy and improve patient outcomes.

The PharmD vs. BSPharmacy status for prescribing authority will need to be addressed in some manner. Pharmacists were making decisions regarding appropriate medication selection and use decades ago. It wasn’t until the prescriber and dispenser functions began to change that pharmacists  began to lose the authority to ‘prescribe’ all but those medications given OTC status. Generally speaking, most RPhs have as much knowledge and decision making skills when it comes to prescribing as those who prescribe the prescription orders they fill and dispense. Same with PharmDs.

Yes, it is time for pharmacists to be given prescribing authority, if even on a limited basis. I would expect that this authority would be expanded after a year or two of monitoring said prescribing authority based on the positive outcomes we would see.

Nearly three years ago I wrote a blog post titled ‘OBRA (’90), Where art Thou… and Where art We?’ .  In it I wrote  the following paragraph as I was questioning why many pharmacists are reluctant to be ‘patient pro-active’ and get involved with changing trends in the profession

” I don’t understand why some pharmacists have been reluctant to get involved with the evolution of their profession and provide effective patient counseling. Perhaps those pharmacists are practicing in a workplace not conducive to patient counseling or maybe they are fearfull of patient interaction. Possibly they are just not interested in getting involved, in which case I would suggest they consider a new profession. Regardless of the specific scenario, I think it is time for another call for action. Pharmacists need to get involved in counseling and educating their patients now!”  (Pharmacy 2.0 and 1/2 March 18th, 2009).

Fast forward to the year 2012.  The pharmacy world continues to watch and wait as we follow the WAG vs. ESI saga amidst reducing third party reimbursement, changing pharmacy regulations and many pharmacy Boards extending a ‘blind eye’ towards idiotic (or insane)  ‘15 minutes or it’s free ‘ types of corporate policies that are dangerous for the public and demeaning to the practice of pharmacy.

I’ve heard it for years… pharmacists will be providing counseling and cognitive services to patients and GETTING PAID FOR IT in the near future.   I remember first hearing it before I graduated from pharmacy school in the ’70s.  I always believed it and thought OBRA ’90 legislation might be the beginning of it.  But I was disappointed to see this happening only in a few areas of pharmacy like long term care.  Many pharmacists failed to recognize the potential for patient counseling and most members of the pharmacy corporate world continued to place profits before patients, ignoring the need and disregarding the future of the profession.

But I still believed it to be true.  Pharmacists will be providing comprehensive patient counseling and cognitive services and getting paid for it.  This is a valuable service to provide to our patients and customers that will improve their lives.  This is a service that saves health care dollars in the long run.

Early this century, MTM became the new pharmacy buzz word.   According to my ‘trusted sources’ at Wikipedia, Medication therapy management (MTM) is a partnership between the pharmacist, the patient and their caregiver, and other health professionals that promotes the safe and effective use of medications and helps patients achieve the targeted outcomes from medication therapy.  (see www.pharmacist.com)

I like that definition of MTM.  Unlike the Medication Modernization Act 2003 it specifically states that MTM is a partnership between THE PHARMACIST, the patient and their caregiver.  Not a nurse, not a physician or any other health care professional.  The pharmacist is THE member of the health care team best qualified to provide medication therapy management services.

So who’s ready to get on board with MTM?  Will pharmacists finally step up to the plate and qualify themselves to be actively involved with MTM?  The future is happening right now!  Pharmacists are being paid for MTM and other cognitive services.  This is becoming reality and will become the norm in pharmacy practice.

There is power in numbers.  It will only be through the power of those involved in providing these types services.  It cannot be achieved any other way.  Not by by associations or organizations;  and certainly not through legislation or pharmacy boards.  It will only come from the strength of those providing the MTM services.  Everyone and everything else is only an appendage and supportive in nature.

Together, as a unified group, MTM pharmacists can make that happen.  You might ask “how are we to do this”?  

The Community Clinical Pharmacists MTM Group on LinkedIn is one of the ways to achieve this.  If you have not started a LinkedIn profile you need to consider it now, especially if you want to start an MTM practice.  The ccpMTMgroup is designed primarily for pharmacists who are interested in providing independent MTM consulting services.  This is the first step in setting up a network of MTM pharmacists committed to promoting and providing pharmacy MTM services.  I invite you to join this group and take part in the discussion and be part of this transition towards independent MTM consulting. As a group we can overcome the obstacles in our path and achieve this goal.

Albert Einstein  defined insanity as “doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results”.  Pharmacists cannot expect to continue with a ‘business as usual’ attitude and expect the necessary changes to take place.  We need to create an environment to accommodate these changes.

Now is the time for a new call to action that stimulates pharmacists to take steps to make this change happen. Pharmacists cannot continue (as @empress_penguin ‘s Twitter profile translates) like  “clumsy penguins swimming in the sea of mothers across health and welfare”  and expect this change to happen.  (Google Translate – Japanese to English).  (Since I don’t speak Japanese I don’t fully understand what that means but it seems to be representative and descriptive of the pharmacy profession at times.)

We need to change that now.  Pharmacists need to stop swimming ‘clumsily’ and erratically with the currents.  We need to set our sites on the goal and fight the currents in the river of Lethe we’ve been in for years.  Pharmacists must learn to swim upstream towards those goals that will maximize our efforts to improve patient care and strengthen our position as a health care professionals.

Decide now to commit to action or get out of the way of progress.  If you stood back with a ‘wait and see’ attitude when OBRA ’90 was put in place, we don’t need you now – unless you are ready to step up and make the necessary changes.  “It’s time to get down and dirty and practical, so let’s focus on what might really work to make progress on… change at the grassroots level”.  (see ‘How to Create Change’, sustainablebusiness.com)

To be successful in this endeavor MTM Pharmacists need to:

  • Decide to ‘DO IT’ and incorporate MTM opportunities into their pharmacy practice
  • Commit to a PLAN OF ACTION to facilitate the necessary changes for practicing appropriate MTM principles
  • FOLLOW THROUGH with their plan for implementing MTM within their practice setting
  • Support and encourage their colleagues who are involved with MTM and educate the public to the benefits of MTM services
We cannot continue with the ‘wait and see’ attitude that has constrained the profession of pharmacy in the past.  If we educate ourselves, educate our patients, get involved and follow the course we will gain momentum in the process and our efforts will bring positive results.  But it’s up to us, YOU and I, to work towards this end.

 

Many pharmacies are now offering their patients a thirty day supply of generic medications for the low price of $4.  Most think that this is the greatest thing since sliced bread.  I know people who were spending $40 to $200 a month or more on prescriptions that are now saving a great deal of money.  This savings not only makes most of them very happy but boosts their self image by making them feel like saavy shoppers.  On the surface it may seem like a win-win situation.  But is the $4 prescription phenonema really an answer to the need for better, more cost efficient pharmacy services?

 

Let me share a couple of experiences that may seem unrelated to the $4 prescription.  This past year I was interviewing website developers and given a number of quotes for setting up my website.  Several of them gave me bids and explanations of what they would do for me at very reasonable prices, considerably below others designers I spoke to.  But the little voice kept creeping into my head saying “you get what you pay for”.  I opted to go with a website developer who was willing to go beyond the basics of building the site; one who was willing to provide their services to me to ensure that I would be able to manage and optimize it as well.  I am not only getting a website that I can be proud of but also learning how to use other web based tools to support my business.  By doing this my life has been made simpler and I will benefit long term from their advice and support.

 

Another example that comes to mind is auto repair.  I had a car that had clutch problems that needed to be taken care of.   I sought out the nearest “shade tree mechanic” type of shop that had the lowest labor charges in town.   He installed a new slave cylinder which solved the clutch problem for about two days.  I made repeated trips to the mechanic’s shop over the next few weeks finding that he had no long term solution for the problem.   I went to another shop and found more knowledgable mechanics who solved the problem the next day.  Had I just taken the vehicle to them in the first place my life would have been simpler and it would have cost less money in the long run.  I wished that the voice would have reminded me that “you get what you pay for”.

 

Where am I going with this?  Pharmacy services are more than just counting and pouring, licking and sticking the labels that go on the $4 prescription bottles.  Ask yourself some of these questions. How much money are you saving buying ten prescriptions a month at $4 each from a pharmacist who fails to tell you how to take them correctly?  Does the pharmacist take the time to know your medical condition sufficiently and to listen to your questions and provide information needed to treat your condition?  And what of the medications prescribed that are not on the $4 list? Does the pharmacist just charge you the $89.67 price for that prescription or does he take the time to discuss less expensive alternatives with your physician?  Do you even have the opportunity to really talk to him when you need to?

 

Purchasing pharmacy services is really not any different than your other purchases in life.  You will usually always “get what you pay for”.  Many pharmacies are now understaffed trying to keep businesses profitable selling $4 prescriptions.  Their pharmacists are under a great deal of pressure trying to ensure that your prescriptions are ready when you request them.  Patients are complaining of long wait times for prescriptions as well as the lack of adequate counceling from the pharmacist.   The $4 prescription price provides instant gratification while ignoring the pharmacy services that are truly going to benefit the patient. Remember “you get what you pay for” the next time you are buying your $4 prescription and ask yourself if it’s really worth it in the long run.